Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Memory Keepers Daughter

So finally time to review the "Memory Keepers Daugher." I thought it was a great book, but it was some what depressing. Depressing to see how many lives were upset due to one mans secret. A very big secret!

We discussed this book in another book club the other night and thoughts were all over the board.

Here's a few questions that were pondered, let me know your thoughts:

1. When David hands his baby girl over to Caroline and tells Norah that she has died, what was your immediate emotional reaction?

2. Though David wanted no part of her, Phoebe goes on to lead a full life, bringing much joy to Caroline and Al. Her story calls into question how we determine what kind of life is worth living. How would you define such a life? In contrast to Phoebe's, how would you describe the quality of Paul's life as he grew up?

3. After Norah has successfully destroyed the wasps' nest, Edwards writes that there was something happening in Norah's life, "an explosion, some way in which life could never be the same" (p. 139). What does she mean, and what is the significance of Norah's "fight" with these wasps?

4. The secret that David keeps is enormous and ultimately terribly destructive to himself and his family. Can you imagine a circumstance when it might be the right choice to shield those closest to you from the truth?

2 comments:

LesleyAnn said...

I agree that it is a great book, but somewhat emotionally depressing to read, definitely not a fluff read....
1. I was very shocked and angry.
2. I don't think that it is up to us to determine what is worthwhile, that is up to our maker. We as adults just need to adjust to live differently than originally thought. I think Paul was the cheated one, he grew up in a cold environment without the outwardly knowledge of the love, laughter we all desire.
3. I think she took control of her life and started living her "own" life and not as a family...but for herself.
4. No. They always say the truth will set you free and I believe this. It may cause hurt and pain but I would rather know and deal then live under a cloud of self doubt and unknowing.
Still a little all over the board in what I think about the characters and their actions. I kept thinking to myself...tell her, tell her....so many things in the book I would have done differently. Makes you really think of your own actions and how they can domino...

Jana said...

1. ..what was your immediate emotional reaction?

I was so angry at him. I was of course thinking of him as a Dr. of the present and thinking how unethical & unprofessional he was.....then had to remember he was a Dr. of the 1960's.

2. Her story calls into question how we determine what kind of life is worth living. How would you define such a life?

How would you define such a life is pretty rhetorical.....my feelings are strong that any life is worth living and we really don't know what the future holds, but have to have faith in God, and do the best we can with what we have.
Phoebe's life was good, challenging, yet she received quality of life compared to if she was growing up in the convelescent home. She had an authentic family experience.

In contrast to Phoebe's, how would you describe the quality of Paul's life as he grew up?

Paul was a witness of a tense marriage. He lived in a life of pressure where perfection was expected. His life was challenging when it came to relationships. He had quantity and maybe some quality in his life, but it wasn't authentic.


3. After Norah has successfully destroyed the wasps' nest, Edwards writes that there was something happening in Norah's life, "an explosion, some way in which life could never be the same" (p. 139). What does she mean, and what is the significance of Norah's "fight" with these wasps?

It was like she took her whole might to fight out the demons/toxic life that was building it's nest around her.
Then changed to make HER life.

4. Can you imagine a circumstance when it might be the right choice to shield those closest to you from the truth? I don't know if I can phathom that choice, I'm too open with my feelings and I wouldn't be able to keep it in, and because I'd hate it to snowball into something worse. It would take much prayer and faith in God.